Christian Scholars Group

Current Members of the Christian Scholars Group

Dr. Victoria Barnett

 Barnett Vicki-csg

Victoria Barnett is Staff Director, Committee on Church Relations, of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. She is a graduate of Indiana University and Union Theological Seminary, New York (M. Div.) and holds a doctorate in religion and conflict from the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University.

She is the author of For the Soul of the People: Protestant Protest against Hitler (Oxford University Press, 1992) and Bystanders: Conscience and Complicity during the Holocaust (Greenwood Press, 1999), and editor/translator of Wolfgang Gerlach’s And the Witnesses were Silent: the Confessing Church and the Jews (University of Nebraska Press, 2000) and Dietrich Bonhoeffer: A Biography (Fortress Press, 2000), as well as numerous articles and book chapters on the churches during the Holocaust. She is also coeditor of the Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works project, the English translation series of Bonhoeffer’s complete works, whose final volume in the 16-volume series is nearing completion.

 


Dr. James Bernauer, S.J.

Bernauer James2

James Bernauer is the Kraft Family Professor at Boston College where he has been in the Philosophy Department since 1980.  He is currently also Director of the Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College.   His fields of interest include Holocaust Studies, the Philosophies of Michel Foucault and Hannah Arendt, and Fascism.

The author of many publications, his recent books are: "Secular Self-Sacrifice: On Michel Foucault's Courses at the Collège de France." Forthcoming in Michel Foucault: The Legacy (Continuum)."From European Anti-Jesuitism to German Anti-Jewishness: A Tale of Two Texts." Forthcoming in The Substance of Things Hoped For: A Festschrift Honoring Stanislaw Musial."A Catholic Conversation with Hannah Arendt." Friends on the Way: Jesuits Encounter Contemporary Judaism (New York: Fordham University Press, 2007)."Philosophizing After the Holocaust." Jesuit Postmodern: Scholarship, Vocation, and Identity in the 21st Century (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2006).

 


Dr. Mary C. Boys, S.N.J.M.

Boys

Mary C. Boys is Dean of Academic Affairs and Skinner and McAlpin Professor of Practical Theology at Union Theological Seminary, New York City. She also serves as an adjunct faculty member of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America and Teachers College, Columbia University. Prior to her present appointment, she served for seventeen years on the faculty of Boston College. She has been a visiting Lecturer of Religious Education at Princeton Theological Seminary, Claremont School of Theology, John Carroll University, Villanova University, and St. Mary's College (London, England). She has also been a Lilly Research Fellow and a Henry Luce III Fellow in Theology for 2005. She is a member of the editorial boards of Studies in Jewish-Christian Relations, the Journal of Religious Education (Australia), Teaching Theology and Religion, and Religious Education.

Prof. Boys is the author of books: Biblical Interpretation in Religious Education (1980), Educating in Faith: Maps and Visions (1989), Jewish-Christian Dialogue: One Woman’s Experience (1997), Has God Only One Blessing? Judaism as a Source of Christian Self-Understanding (2000), Redeeming Our Sacred Story: The Death of Jesus and Relations between Jews and Christians (2013) and with Sara S. Lee: Christians and Jews in Dialogue: Learning in the Presence of the Other (2006). Her edited books include Seeing Judaism Anew: Christianity's Sacred Obligation (2005). She has also published some seventy articles in books and journals such as Concilium, Horizons, Religious Education, Biblical Theology Bulletin, Cross Currents, SIDIC, the Journal of Ecumenical Studies, Midstream, the Dictionary of Jewish-Christian Relations, and the Encyclopedia of Women and Religion in North America.


Dr. Robert Cathey

Cathey

Robert Cathey is Professor of Theology at McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago. Ordained in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), he has taught at The Near East School of Theology (Beirut, Lebanon), Monmouth College (Monmouth, IL), Davidson College, and William Paterson University (NJ). He is a member of the Christian Leadership Initiative of the American Jewish Committee and the Shalom Hartman Institute (Jerusalem) that included intensive study in Jerusalem in July 2010 and 2011. He serves in the Ecumenical and Inter-Religious Work Group of the Presbytery of Chicago.

The author of God in Postliberal Perspective: Between Realism and Non-Realism (Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2009), he has written or co-authored essays, articles, or reviews in Modern Theology, The Review of Metaphysics, Interpretation, Ars Disputandi, Currents in Theology and Mission, Ecumenical Trends, McCormick Notes, Theological Education, Pro Ecclesia, Princeton Seminary Bulletin, Union Seminary Quarterly Review, and Theological Students Fellowship Bulletin. He contributed chapters or articles to Feasting on the Word: Lectionary Commentary Series (Westminster John Knox Press); Shaping Beloved Community: Multicultural Theological Education (Westminster John Knox Press, 2006); Ecumenical Theology in Worship, Doctrine, and Life (Oxford University Press, 1999); Festschrift in Honor of Charles Speel (Monmouth College, 1996); Dictionary of Christianity in America (InterVarsity Press, 1990).


Dr. Philip A. Cunningham

PAC CSG

Philip A. Cunningham is Professor of Theology (specializing in Christian-Jewish Relations) and director of the Institute for Jewish-Catholic Relations of Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia, PA. He also serves as secretary-treasurer of the Council of Centers on Jewish-Christian Relations, a vice-president of the International Council of Christians and Jews, and has been a member of the Advisory Committee on Catholic-Jewish Relations for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. He was the project editor of the ICCJ's 2009 statement, "A Time for Recommitment: Building the New Relationship between Jews and Christians."

Interested in biblical studies, religious education, and theologies of Christian-Jewish relations, he is the author of numerous book and articles on these subjects. His most recent book, Christ Jesus and the Jewish People Today: New Explorations of Theological Interrelationships, published by Eerdmans Publishing Co.in 2011 was co-edited with Joseph Sievers, Mary Boys, Hans Hermann Henrix, and Jesper Svartvik. Prior books are the co-edited volume The Catholic Church and the Jewish People: Recent Reflections from Rome, published by Fordham University Press (2007); the edited collection Pondering the Passion: What’s at Stake for Christians and Jews? published by Sheed & Ward (2005); Sharing the Scriptures: Volume 1 of The Word Set Free (Stimulus Foundation/ Paulist Press, 2003); and A Story of Shalom: The Calling of Christians and Jews by a Covenanting God; (Stimulus Foundation/Paulist Press, 2001).


Dr. Eugene J. Fisher

Eugene J. Fisher

Eugene J. Fisher is Distinguished Professor of Catholic-Jewish Studies at Saint Leo University in Saint Leo, Florida. He earned his doctorate in 1976 at New York University in Hebrew Culture and Education, his dissertation entitled, "'The Treatment of Jews and Judaism in Current Roman Catholic Teaching." Dr. Fisher was appointed as the specialist in Catholic-Jewish Relations for the Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops (NCCB) in May of 1977, a post in which served until 2007.. In 1981 he was named Consultor to the Vatican Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews, serving in that capacity for 25 years. He has lectured widely throughout the United States, Canada and Europe. In 1995, a book he co-edited with Rabbi Leon Klenicki, John Paul II, Spiritual Pilgrimage: Texts on Jews and Judaism (Crossroad) won the National Jewish Book Award in the Jewish-Christian Relations category.

He has published or edited some 20 books and over 250 articles in the field of Jewish-Christian relations, including: The Jewish Roots of Christian Liturgy, ed. (Paulist, 1990); Interwoven Destinies: Jews and Christians through the Ages, ed. (Paulist/Stimulus, 1992); Faith Without Prejudice: Rebuilding Christian Attitudes Toward Judaism (Crossroad, 1993); Visions of the Other: Jewish and Christian Theologians Assess the Dialogue, ed. (Paulist/Stimulus, 1994); A Prophet of Our Time: An Anthology of the Writings of Rabbi Marc H. Tannenbaum, ed. with Judith H. Banki (Fordham University Press, 2002). He also co-edited with Leon Klenicki the newly published The Saint for Shalom: How Pope John Paul II Transformed Catholic-Jewish Relations (Crossroad, 2011) and edited the forthcoming Memoria Futuri: Catholic-Jewish Dialogue Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow; Texts and Addresses of Cardinal William H. Keeler (Paulist/Stimulus, 2012).


Dr. Katharina von Kellenbach

Chair

Katharina von Kellenbach

Katharina von Kellenbach is Professor of Religious Studies and former Chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, the Honors College of the State of Maryland. A native of West Germany, she studied Evangelical Theology in Berlin and Göttingen (1979-1982) and received her PhD from the religion department at Temple University in Philadelphia in 1990. She is the former co-chair of the “Religion, Genocide and Holocaust” Group at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion..

Her areas of expertise include feminist theology and Jewish-Christian relations, the ordination, life and work of the first female Rabbi Regina Jonas of Berlin (1902-1944) and the theological, ethical, personal and political issues raised by the Holocaust. Her current research project examines the political implications of the Christian theological emphasis on forgiveness based on the historical records of prison chaplains’ pastoral work with Nazi perpetrators in post-war Germany.

She is currently completing a book titled “The Mark of Cain:Prison Chaplains Counsel Perpetrators of the Shoah. In summer of 2011, she served as co-facilitator of the four-week long Coolidge Research Colloquium Explorations at the Intersection of Religious Pluralism and Jewish-Christian Dialogue, Union Theological Seminary, New York City. She serves on the editorial boards of Cross Currents, Journal ofReligion and Gender,Kirche und Israel, and theologie.geschichte: Zeitschrift für Theologie und Kulturgeschichte. She co-edited with Annette Esser and Annette Mehlhorn, Feminist Approaches to Interreligious Dialogue (Leuven: Peeters Verlag, 2009).


Dr. Bjőrn Krondorfer

Bjorn Krondorfer

Dr. Bjőrn Krondorfer is Endowed Professor of Religious Studies and Director of Martin-Springer Institute at Northern Arizona University. His expertise is in the Western religious traditions with particular interests in cultural studies, Holocaust studies, and gender studies. He is the 2012 recipient of the Norton Dodge Award for Scholarly and Creative Achievements. He also delivered the Jerome Cardin Memorial Lecture at Baltimore's Loyola University (2012) and the William Temple Lecture as the first speaker at the Jaamiatul-ilm Wal-Huda (Islamic College) in conjunction with Blackburn Cathedral, UK.

His recent books are Male Confessions: Intimate Revelations and the Religious Imagination (Stanford UP, 2010); Men and Masculinities in Christianity and Judaism: A Critical Reader (SCM Press, 2009); and Mit Blick auf die Täter (2006 [Facing Perpetrators: Querying German Theology after 1945]). His book Remembrance and Reconciliation was published in 1992 by Yale University Press.

Krondorfer facilitates and organizes intercultural dialogue and encounter programs. They include the International Summer Program on the Holocaust, interreligious clergy groups, engaging in creative explorations with artists, and leading Bibliodrama seminars.

At St. Mary’s College, he has been serving as Vice President of the Faculty Senate, as chair of the Curriculum Committee, and on the Strategic Planning Committee.


Fr. Michael McGarry

Michael McGarry

Michael McGarry, a native of Los Angeles, studied for the priesthood for the Paulist Fathers in Baltimore and Washington, DC, and did his graduate work in theology at the University of St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto. He has also studied Jewish studies at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. For many years, he has been involved in Jewish-Christian relations, speaking on a variety of topics including Christology, preaching, and Shoah education. He has written Christology After Auschwitz and (with Yehezkel Landau) Pope John Paul II in the Holy Land. He has served on the Advisory Committee to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops on Catholic-Jewish Relations. He has served in many pastoral and academic settings, including rector of St. Paul’s College in Washington DC, and pastor of Newman Hall, the Catholic Parish at the University of California, Berkeley. For eleven years, he was the rector of the Tantur Ecumenical Institute in Jerusalem. Currently he serves in New York as president of the Paulist Fathers.

His many writings include: “One Christian Perspective On Land and the State of Israel,” Studies in Christian-Jewish Relations 3(2008): Article 31; “The Land of Israel in the Cauldron of the Middle East: A Challenge to Christian-Jewish Relations,” in Seeing Judaism Anew: Christianity’s Sacred Obligation, edited by Mary C. Boys (Lanham, MD: Sheed & Ward, 2005), 260-75; “Jews and Christians: Where Are We Forty Years after Nostra Aetate?” Chicago Studies 44 (Summer 2005):2:113-29; “The Path to a Journey,” in John C. Merkle, ed. Faith Transformed: Christian Encounters with Jews and Judaism (Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 2003), 144-61; and “Conversion and Identity in Israel/Palestine,” in Dagmar Heller, ed. Bekehrung und Identität in Beheft zur Okumenischen Rundschau, Nr. 73(Frankfurt: Verlag Otto Lembeck, 2003), 191-200.


Dr. Esther Menn

Menn Esther-csg

Esther Menn is the Ralph W. and Marilyn R. Klein Professor of Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and the Director of Advanced Studies (Th.M. and Ph.D. Programs) at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. Previously she taught at the University of Chicago, the University of Virginia, and California Lutheran University. Her Ph.D. in Hebrew Bible is from the University of Chicago Divinity School.

She is the author of Judah and Tamar (Genesis 38) in Ancient Jewish Exegesis: Studies in Literary Form and Hermeneutics and a co-editor of Contesting Texts: Jews and Christians in Conversation about the Bible. She is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Consultative Panel on Lutheran-Jewish Relations and contributed the chapter on “Law and Gospel” to this panel’s volume of essays, Covenantal Conversations: Christians in Dialogue with Jews and Judaism, ed. Darrell Jodock.

At the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago she organizes events and conferences in Jewish-Christian relations and co-leads with Barbara Rossing a semi-annual travel seminar, “World of the Bible: Ancient Sites and Current Struggles in the Holy Land.”

 

Dr. John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M.

John T. Pawlikowski

John T. Pawlikowski, a priest of the Servite Order, serves as Professor of Social Ethics at the Catholic Theological Union in Chicago, where he also directs the Catholic-Jewish Studies Program in the school's Cardinal Joseph Bernardin Center.  He served for six years as President of the International Council of Christians & Jews.  He was also appointed by President Jimmy Carter to the United States Holocaust Memorial Council and reappointed for three successive terms by Presidents George Bush and Bill Clinton. He currently serves on the Governor's Commission for Holocaust and Genocide in his home state of Illinois. 

He is the author/editor of more than fifteen books including The Challenge of the Holocaust for Christian Theology, Christ in the Light of the Christian-Jewish Dialogue, Jesus and the Theology of Israel, Biblical and Theological Reflections on The Challenge of Peace, Justice in the Marketplace: CTU’s Pastoral Commentary on the Bishops’ letter on the Economy, The Ecological Challenge: Ethical, Liturgical, and Spiritual Responses, Reinterpreting Revelation and Tradition: Jews and Christians in Conversation, Good and Evil after Auschwitz, and Ethics in the Shadow of the Holocaust.


Dr. Peter A. Pettit

Pettit Peter-csg

Peter A. Pettit is director of the Institute for Jewish-Christian Understanding and Associate Professor of Religion Studies at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, PA. He is a Lutheran pastor and a theological advisor to the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the International Council of Christians and Jews, and the World Council of Churches. He has been an International Fellow of the Shalom Hartman Institute, Jerusalem, since 1984 and co-leads its annual theological conference. From 2002 to 2006, he was the founding chair of the Council of Centers on Jewish-Christian Relations.  

Pettit holds the Ph.D. from Claremont Graduate University and has held residential fellowships at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, American Jewish University in Los Angeles, and the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies. His research focuses on the hermeneutics of self-understanding in Jewish and Christian communities, particularly as they relate to one another, and includes biblical studies, theology, liturgy, and Israel studies.

He is a contributor to the Dictionary of Jewish-Christian Relations (Cambridge 2005), Seeing Judaism Anew (Rowman and Littlefield 2005) and Covenantal Conversations (Fortress 2008), and co-authored Talking Points: Topics in Jewish-Christian Relations for the ELCA. He has designed and authored curriculum resources for interfaith encounter at the IJCU.  His articles on interfaith relations and hermeneutics include “Christ Alone, the Hidden God, and Lutheran Exclusivism” (Word & World, 1991), “Along the Way to a Clearer Mutual Understanding” (CCAJ Journal, 2005), and “Christian Zionism and Christian-Jewish Relations” (Journal of Lutheran Ethics, 2007).


Dr. Elena Procario-Foley

procario-foley2

Elena Procario-Foley is the Brother John G. Driscoll Professor of Jewish-Catholic Studies at Iona College in New Rochelle, New York. She holds Ph.D. and MA degrees in theology from the Divinity School of the University of Chicago. Her dissertation explored the Christology of the Flemish Dominican Edward Schillebeeckx.

For the past twelve years she has worked to re-vision theology through the lens of Jewish-Christian reconciliation. Since 1999, Procario-Foley has served as the Driscoll Professor of Jewish-Catholic Studies at Iona College.

Among other publications, she is the author of “Heir or Orphan? Theological Evolution and Devolution Before and After Nostra Aetate” in The Church of the Future, Annual Volume 51 of the College Theology Society, William Madges, ed.. (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Press, 2006). She has co-edited Frontiers in Catholic Feminist Theology: Shoulder to Shoulder (Fortress Press, Oct 2009); her chapter in that book is “Liberating Jesus: Christian Feminism and Anti-Judaism.” She is also editor of a forthcoming volume Children of the Living God: Explorations in Jewish-Catholic Dialogue (in development with Paulist Press). She was visiting scholar at the Siena College Kieval Institute for Jewish-Christian Studies in 2007, has lectured at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City, and frequently speaks for parishes and synagogues. Procario-Foley leads annual study-abroad courses for undergraduate students to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Procario-Foley is the past chair of the Council of Centers on Jewish-Christian Relations and former secretary of the College Theology Society. She also serves on the boards of the Catholic Theological Society of America, the Stimulus Foundation of Paulist Press and the Manhattan College Holocaust Resource Center. Most recently, she completed the 13 month Christian Leadership Initiative, a fellowship sponsored by the American Jewish Committee and the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem, Israel.


Dr. Jean-Pierre Ruiz

Jean-Pierre Ruiz

Jean-Pierre Ruiz is Director of the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies at St. John's University. An Associate Professor in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies, he is also a Senior Fellow of the Vincentian Center for Church and Society.

Ruiz earned the doctorate from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, and his research interests include biblical studies (prophetic and apocalyptic literature, Hispanic theology, and interfaith relations. His publications include Readings from the Edges: The Bible and People on the Move (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 2011), as well as The Word of God and Latino Catholics: The Teachings of the Road to Emmaus, edited with Mario J. Paredes (New York: American Bible Society, 2012).

A Past-President of the Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States, he is editor in chief of the Journal of Hispanic / Latino Theology (http://Latinotheology.org).

 

 

Dr. Karla Suomala

Suomala Karla

 

Karla Suomala is Associate Professor of Religion at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa.  She did her Ph.D. at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion.  At present she teaches courses in Biblical Studies, Judaism, Interfaith Engagement and Gender/Religion.  She is currently preparing a new study-away course called “From the Middle Ages to the Holocaust: Jews and Judaism in Europe” for students at Luther (January 2013). 

Among her research interests are Jewish­-Christian­-Muslim dialogue; the history of biblical interpretation with a focus on Jewish writers in the Greco-Roman and Rabbinic periods; and gender studies.  She has been a scholar in residence at Tantur Ecumenical Institute in Jerusalem (2010) and Holden Village in Chelan, WA (2009) and is a participant in the Hartman Theology Conference at the Hartman Institute in Jerusalem (2006-present).  She was also an AAR/Henry Luce Foundation Fellow for the Summer Seminar on Theologies of Religious Pluralism and Comparative Theology (2009-2010). 

Karla’s recent publications include  “Response to Kurt Cardinal Koch” (Studies in Christian-Jewish Relations, Vol. 7, No 1, 2012), “The Taming of Job in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam” (World & World, Fall 2011), and “The New (con)Texts of Jewish-Christian Engagement,” Intersections (Spring 2011).  She is also the author of Moses and God in Dialogue: Exodus 32-34 in Postbiblical Literature, Studies in Biblical Literature, 61 (New York: Lang, 2004); and two chapters in Covenantal Conversations: Christians in Dialogue with Jews and Judaism:  "Understanding Jewish Devotion to the Land," and "Healing the World and Mending the Soul: Understanding Tikkun Olam," edited by Darrell Jodock (Fortress Press: Minneapolis, 2008).   She has also written a number of case studies in cooperation with the Interfaith Youth Core.   
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Dr. Demetrios Tonias

Demetrios Tonias

 

Fr. Demetrios Tonias is the pastor of the Taxiarchae/Archangels Greek Orthodox Church in Watertown, MA and an Ecumenical Officer of the Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Boston.

He is a graduate of the Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology where he earned the degrees of Master of Divinity and Master of Theology. Fr. Tonias also recently received his Ph.D. from Boston College where his studies focused on Jewish-Christian relations in general and the early church and Jewish-Christian relationship in particular. His dissertation studied "Abraham in the Works of John Chrysostom."

 

 

 


 

Dr. Reggie Williams

 Williams Reggie-web

Dr. Reggie Williams is Assistant Professor of Christian Ethics at McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago. Previously, he taught ethics at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, and Practical Theology at Azusa Pacific University in Azusa, California.

Dr. Williams’ research interests are primarily focused on Christological hermeneutics, and Christian morality. Particularly, how the Western-world's understanding of Christianity has been calibrated to a false ideal that corresponds with racialized interpretations of humanity, morality, and Jesus. His current projects include an analysis of the developments within Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s theology and ethics, as a result of his experience in the Harlem Renaissance, 1930-31.

Dr. Williams received his Ph.D. in Christian ethics at Fuller Theological Seminary in 2011. His dissertation was entitled: “Christ-Centered Empathic Resistance: The Influence of Harlem Renaissance Theology on the Incarnational Ethic of Dietrich Bonhoeffer.” He earned a Master’s degree in Theology from Fuller in 2006 and a Bachelor’s degree in Religious Studies from Westmont College in 1995. He was a Dissertation Fellow with the Fund for Theological education, and is a member of the American Academy of Religion and the Society for Christian Ethics.

He is the author of Dietrich Bonhoeffer in the Harlem Renaissance (forthcoming from Baylor University Press) and several articles.